Winter Park Ready For Skiers

From Regional Mobility, December 1985

“Winter is a problematical time for most people with ambulatory disabilites because of the curious relationship between themselves and snow…”

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Poems, Prayers, Prosthetics; An Adventure

“Not many people have the misfortune, or privilege, however you feel about it, to own and operate an artificial appendage. But those of us who do, through design or default, are privy to a few “different” experiences in life that can sometimes fall into the category of humorous. Or to the more pristine soul, morbidly funny to hilarious.

For us, prosthetics is not just another dirty word, nor a dirty profession, just an expensive and tongue-tripping name for that counterfeit ‘thing’ that we strap onto our otherwise healthy bodies to take the place of that one, two or more fleshly outgrowths called limbs that we have somehow managed to lose in our lifetimes. Or temporarily misplace, if you believe the Christian Scientists that it all comes back to you.

‘Is that a sprain?’ an innocent young man asked me in Aspen one crisp winter night as I hobbled gracelessly on the ice on my crutches…”

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My Viewpoint: “Real Gimps”

From Regional Mobility Magazine, December, 1985

“We all joke around about relative levels of disability. Above-the-knee amputees (ak’s) will joke around about below-the-knee amputees: “B-ks are almost human.” But let’s face it. Sometimes even a b-k feels like a real gimp.

I once met a freestyle skier who had blown her knee out the previous season and was three-tracking during her convelescence. She liked it so much, she started to call herself handicapped…”

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CALEidoscope: “Super Gimps”

From, Regional Mobility Magazine, February, 1986

“Last month I made a distinction between the person with an athletic injury and the “real gimp’ This month’s column is a commentary on the rarest breed of gimp, the supergimp.

In case you’re not familiar with the term, gimps are humans possessing an abnormal walking style, commonly described as a limp, later bastardized to “gimp” to refer to both the gait and the person whose mobility is impaired. More recently the term has been…”

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