Poems, Prayers, Prosthetics; An Adventure

“Not many people have the misfortune, or privilege, however you feel about it, to own and operate an artificial appendage. But those of us who do, through design or default, are privy to a few “different” experiences in life that can sometimes fall into the category of humorous. Or to the more pristine soul, morbidly funny to hilarious.

For us, prosthetics is not just another dirty word, nor a dirty profession, just an expensive and tongue-tripping name for that counterfeit ‘thing’ that we strap onto our otherwise healthy bodies to take the place of that one, two or more fleshly outgrowths called limbs that we have somehow managed to lose in our lifetimes. Or temporarily misplace, if you believe the Christian Scientists that it all comes back to you.

‘Is that a sprain?’ an innocent young man asked me in Aspen one crisp winter night as I hobbled gracelessly on the ice on my crutches…”

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Colorado Arlberg Club Lives on At Ski Area

From Alpenglow Magazine

“Nestled into a comforter of snow, five little ginger bread houses sleep peacefully in the lap of the booming metropolitan ski area of Winter Park. These five Swiss-style chalets, built over the last 50 years around the first orginal Alpine ski clubhouse in Colorado, are the home of the Colorado Arlberg Club.

The Colorado Arlberg Ski Club was formed in Denver in 1929 by a group of eight avid skiers. They named it after the then popular ski style developed in Arlberg, Switzerland, and chose as their insignia an A crossed with a ski. They started out skiing the foothills of Denver, and then migrated to Winter Park– then called West Portal–on the Denver and Salt Lake Railroad. The sight opened up to them at the end of the Moffat Tunnel would warm the cockles of their ski-pickin’ hearts.”

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Winter Park’s Blueprint for the Future

From Alpenglow Magazine

“In the late 70’s, the Winter Park Ski Area, which had alway depended on its Denver day-skier market, got its first big plug by the national ski magazines. Said one ski writer, ‘‘If Winter Park were a restaurant, it’d be called ‘Joe’s Eats,’” and when the article went on to describe friendly downhome atmosphere and good skiing, the ski area was on its way to becoming the destination resort area it was aiming for with the development of the Mary Jane.

The Town of Winter Park, which had just been incorporated from the village of Hideaway Park, did not earn the same regard, however, by the national media. Described in the same article as ‘‘a fairly uninspired strip along Highway 40,’’ Winter Park has been working ever since on turning the haphazard strip-city development, which might have occurred in response to the ski area’s rapid gvowth into an inspired and controlled growth, which would interface with the ski area expansion and avoid some of the pitfalls experienced by other mountain resort communities.

Now, eight years later…”

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Barriers a Matter of Perception

From Regional Mobility Magazine, April 3, 1986

“‘Disability is an obstacle illusion.’ Catchy phrase. With this phrase, Rose Kreston hoped the students at Colroado State University would catch Handicapped Awareness Days’ message that it is often the able-bodied community’s perceptions of disability which impede disabled people in their attempts to become an acceptable part of society.

Rose Kreston is a small person. One resists the temptation to say that her job is big. But as Director of Handicapped Students, her job is a far-reaching and varied position that requires organizational, supervisory, advisory and advocacy skills as well as insight into the experience of handicapped people.

Rose brings a broad outlook and background to that role. Disabled since birth by a condition called Osteogenesis…”

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My Viewpoint: “Real Gimps”

From Regional Mobility Magazine, December, 1985

“We all joke around about relative levels of disability. Above-the-knee amputees (ak’s) will joke around about below-the-knee amputees: “B-ks are almost human.” But let’s face it. Sometimes even a b-k feels like a real gimp.

I once met a freestyle skier who had blown her knee out the previous season and was three-tracking during her convelescence. She liked it so much, she started to call herself handicapped…”

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CALEidoscope: “Super Gimps”

From, Regional Mobility Magazine, February, 1986

“Last month I made a distinction between the person with an athletic injury and the “real gimp’ This month’s column is a commentary on the rarest breed of gimp, the supergimp.

In case you’re not familiar with the term, gimps are humans possessing an abnormal walking style, commonly described as a limp, later bastardized to “gimp” to refer to both the gait and the person whose mobility is impaired. More recently the term has been…”

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